‘Einstein’s Fridge’ Review: Heated Arguments

‘Einstein’s Fridge’ Review: Heated Arguments

It’s arguably the most successful scientific theory in history, sweeping and precise and revolutionary. Yet virtually no one cares.

By Sam Kean

During a physics class I took in college, the professor introduced the unit on thermodynamics with a quote from Albert Einstein, who said that it is “the only physical theory of universal content which I am convinced . . . will never be overthrown.” I was suitably impressed. Yet within about 10 minutes, my enthusiasm flagged. Sure, the field might be eternal, but even Einstein’s imprimatur couldn’t glamorize the grubby details of heat exchange and energy conservation.

Such is the fate of thermodynamics. It’s arguably the most successful scientific theory in history, sweeping and precise, and revolutionary all at once. And virtually no one cares.

‘Einstein’s Fridge’ Review: Heated Arguments

It’s arguably the most successful scientific theory in history, sweeping and precise and revolutionary. Yet virtually no one cares.

By Sam Kean

During a physics class I took in college, the professor introduced the unit on thermodynamics with a quote from Albert Einstein, who said that it is “the only physical theory of universal content which I am convinced . . . will never be overthrown.” I was suitably impressed. Yet within about 10 minutes, my enthusiasm flagged. Sure, the field might be eternal, but even Einstein’s imprimatur couldn’t glamorize the grubby details of heat exchange and energy conservation.

Such is the fate of thermodynamics. It’s arguably the most successful scientific theory in history, sweeping and precise, and revolutionary all at once. And virtually no one cares.